CrPC Section 22: Local Jurisdiction of Executive Magistrates in India

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Pinterest
WhatsApp

CrPC Section 22: Local Jurisdiction of Executive Magistrates in India

1. Code:

Section 22 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (CrPC)

2. Explanation:

This section defines the geographical area within which an Executive Magistrate has the power to exercise his/her functions. It outlines the following aspects:

  • General Rule: An Executive Magistrate has jurisdiction over the local area assigned to him/her by the state government.
  • Specific Cases: In certain cases, an Executive Magistrate can exercise his/her powers beyond his/her assigned area, such as:
    • When directed by a superior authority.
    • When pursuing an offender or investigating a case that began in his/her jurisdiction.
    • When the offence was committed within his/her jurisdiction but the offender is found in another area.
  • Exceptions: There are exceptions to this general rule. For example, a Metropolitan Magistrate has jurisdiction over the entire metropolitan area, regardless of the specific area assigned to him/her.

3. Illustration:

Let’s imagine an Executive Magistrate is assigned to a specific district. A crime occurs in a nearby village outside the district. The Executive Magistrate can still investigate the crime if:

  • The accused is found within his/her district.
  • He/she receives specific instructions from a superior officer.

4. Common Questions and Answers:

  • Q: Can an Executive Magistrate investigate a crime that happened outside his/her assigned area?
  • A: Yes, but only under certain circumstances, such as when directed by a superior officer or when the offender is found within his/her jurisdiction.
  • Q: How is the local jurisdiction of an Executive Magistrate determined?
  • A: It is determined by the state government, which assigns a specific area to each Executive Magistrate.
  • Q: Can an Executive Magistrate exercise his/her powers in a different district without any authorization?
  • A: No, generally not. He/she needs either authorization from a superior officer or specific circumstances to justify exercising powers outside his/her assigned area.
Also Read  Section 204 CrPC: Issuing Process - Code of Criminal Procedure
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Pinterest
WhatsApp

Never miss any important news. Subscribe to our newsletter.

Leave Your Comment

Recent News

Editor's Pick