Section 275 CrPC: Record in Warrant Cases – Code of Criminal Procedure

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Pinterest
WhatsApp

Section 275 CrPC: Record in Warrant Cases

This section of the Code of Criminal Procedure deals with the maintenance of records in warrant cases.

1. State the Code

Section 275 CrPC: In every warrant case, the Magistrate shall, at the close of the inquiry or trial, record, in the manner prescribed by the High Court, a judgment, containing a concise statement of the facts proved, the point determined, and the reasons for the decision.

2. Explanation

  • This section applies to all warrant cases, which are cases where the accused is summoned to appear before the court.
  • The Magistrate is required to record a detailed judgment at the conclusion of the inquiry or trial.
  • The judgment must include a concise statement of the facts proved, the points determined, and the reasons for the decision.
  • The format of the judgment is prescribed by the respective High Court.

3. Illustration

Consider a case where a person is accused of theft. The Magistrate, after conducting the inquiry, finds the accused guilty. The Magistrate must then record a judgment in the case file, which includes:

  • A statement of the facts proved, like the stolen items, the evidence of witnesses, and the accused’s confession.
  • The point determined, which is whether the accused committed the theft.
  • The reasons for the decision, which might include the reliability of witnesses, the weight of evidence, and the interpretation of the law.

4. Common Questions and Answers

Q: What is the purpose of Section 275 CrPC?

A: It ensures transparency, accountability, and fairness in the judicial process. The detailed judgment allows for proper review by higher courts and safeguards the rights of the accused.

Also Read  CrPC Section 92: Procedure for Letters and Telegrams - Explained

Q: What happens if the Magistrate fails to comply with Section 275?

A: Failure to comply can be grounds for appeal or revision. The judgment may be considered insufficient or invalid, leading to a potential retrial.

Q: Are there any exceptions to Section 275?

A: Some exceptions exist, such as summary trials or cases where the Magistrate deems it unnecessary to record a detailed judgment.

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Pinterest
WhatsApp

Never miss any important news. Subscribe to our newsletter.

Leave Your Comment

Recent News

Editor's Pick