IPC 110: Punishment for Abetment with Different Intention – Indian Penal Code

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IPC 110: Punishment for Abetment with Different Intention

This section deals with the situation where someone abets the commission of an offence with a different intention than the one with which the offence is actually committed. It is a specific provision addressing the situation where the abettor’s intention differs from the actual outcome.

1. State the Code

Section 110 of the Indian Penal Code (IPC) states:

“Whoever abets any offence with the intention of causing, or knowing that it is likely to cause, a different effect from that which he intended to cause, or which he knew to be likely to be caused, shall be punished with the punishment provided for the offence which he abetted, or with such punishment as is provided for the offence which he intended to cause or knew to be likely to be caused, whichever punishment is the more severe.”

2. Explanation

  • This section applies when the abettor’s intention regarding the outcome of the crime differs from the actual outcome.
  • The abettor may have intended to cause a lesser offence, but the crime committed is more serious.
  • The abettor may have intended a specific outcome, but the actual outcome is different.
  • The punishment is based on the more severe of the two offences: the one abetted and the one intended or likely to be caused.

3. Illustration

Example: A person abets another to steal a mobile phone. The abettor only intended to cause theft of a mobile phone. However, during the robbery, the person committing the theft also assaults the victim. In this case, the abettor is liable for the more severe offence, which is robbery and assault, even though the abettor’s intention was only to abet theft.

Also Read  IPC Section 112: Liability of Abettor for Cumulative Punishment

4. Common Questions and Answers

Q: What is the difference between abetment and aiding?
A: Abetment involves intentionally encouraging, instigating, or aiding someone to commit a crime. Aiding refers to providing material assistance, but without the intent to encourage or instigate.

Q: What if the abettor did not know about the possibility of a more serious outcome?
A: This section applies even if the abettor was unaware of the possibility of a more serious outcome. If the outcome was a natural and probable consequence of the abetted act, the abettor is still liable.

Q: What if the actual offence is less severe than the intended offence?
A: In such cases, the punishment is based on the offence that was actually committed. This is because the abettor cannot be punished for an offence more serious than the one actually committed, even if they intended to cause a more severe offence.

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