CrPC Section 227: Discharge Under Code of Criminal Procedure

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Pinterest
WhatsApp

CrPC Section 227: Discharge Under Code of Criminal Procedure

1. Code

CrPC Section 227, under the Code of Criminal Procedure (CrPC), deals with the discharge of an accused person during the trial proceedings.

2. Explanation

This section empowers the Magistrate, after considering the prosecution evidence, to discharge an accused if they find that there is no sufficient ground for proceeding against the accused.

The Magistrate can discharge the accused if:

  • The prosecution evidence is so weak or unreliable that no reasonable person could convict the accused on that evidence.
  • There is a total absence of evidence against the accused.
  • The evidence does not establish the commission of the alleged offense.
  • The evidence does not connect the accused with the alleged offense.

3. Illustration

Suppose a person is accused of theft. The prosecution presents a witness who claims to have seen the accused near the scene of the crime, but the witness cannot positively identify the accused. The Magistrate, after considering the evidence, may discharge the accused under Section 227, finding no sufficient ground for proceeding against the accused.

4. Common Questions and Answers

Q: What is the difference between discharge under Section 227 and acquittal?

A: Discharge is a decision made by the Magistrate at the initial stage of the trial, before the accused is put on trial. Acquittal, on the other hand, is a decision made by the Court after the trial, where the accused is found not guilty.

Q: Can the accused be re-tried after discharge under Section 227?

A: Yes, the prosecution can re-try the accused if they gather new evidence that overcomes the deficiencies found by the Magistrate. However, the prosecution must obtain permission from the High Court to re-try the accused.

Also Read  Section 125 Of The Code Of Criminal Procedure

Q: What happens if the Magistrate refuses to discharge the accused?

A: The Magistrate will proceed with the trial and frame charges against the accused. The accused will then have an opportunity to defend themselves against the charges.

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Pinterest
WhatsApp

Never miss any important news. Subscribe to our newsletter.

Leave Your Comment

Recent News

Editor's Pick

Apni_Law_Logo_Black

Get Legal Assistance Today!

Fill out the form below to book a consultation with one of our experienced lawyers.

We’ll get back to you promptly to assist with your legal needs.